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Eating even moderate amounts of red and processed meat increases the risk of bowel cancer, according to a study published today by the Nuffield Department of Population Health.

The study, published in International Journal of Epidemiology, showed that people eating on average around 76g of red and processed meat a day, which is roughly in line with UK Government recommendations, still had a 20% higher chance of developing bowel cancer than those who only ate on average about 21g a day.

One in 15 men and 1 in 18 women born after 1960 in the UK will be diagnosed with bowel cancer in their lifetime. This study found that risk rose 19% with every 25g of processed meat (roughly equivalent to a rasher of bacon or slice of ham) people ate per day, and 18% with every 50g of red meat (a thick slice of roast beef or the edible bit of a lamb chop).

Read more (Nuffield Department of Population Health website)

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