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Two Medical Sciences researchers are amongst the seven successful applicants to have been chosen as the 2019-20 cohort of Public Engagement with Research (PER) Leaders.

Dr Katharine Owen (OCDEM, Radcliffe Department of Medicine) and Dr Sean Elias (Jenner InstituteNuffield Department of Medicine) are two of only seven researchers to be chosen in the 2019-20 cohort of Public Engagement with Research (PER) leaders at the University of Oxford. 

The PER Leadership scheme is for academics to take on a leadership role in a culture change project for their departments and faculties to enhance support for PER. The scheme is targeted at those who have a strong interest in PER, who want the opportunity to demonstrate their leadership skills within an academic environment and to explore new ways of working through facilitating change. The seven winners will each receive £5,000 to initiate PER-focused initiatives within their departments, and will participate in training from a variety of internal and external PER and leadership professionals throughout the coming year.

Dr Katharine Owen is a consultant endocrinologist and academic working in OCDEM (with an interest in rare monogenic forms of diabetes and young adult diabetes. She has organised events to showcase the research done at OCDEM and RDM, as well as to mark World Diabetes Day (pictured are schoolchildren recreating the 'blue ring' symbol for World Diabetes day around the Radcliffe Infirmary Fountain,  the 2018 event Dr Owen organised). Read more here.

Dr Sean Elias is Principal Investigator at the Jenner Institute studying non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS). Since May 2016 he has been working with Professor Calman MacLennan on invasive NTS disease in Ghana and Burkina Faso and has more recently run his own clinical studies in the UK and Kenya looking at non-invasive sampling methods for gathering immunological data. As an immunologist he is interested in human antibody and cellular responses to NTS pathogens and how greater understanding of this can aid in future vaccine development. Since 2018 he has run his own public engagement initiative funded through the University Public Engagement with Research Seed Fund program: Oxford University Board Games & Public Engagement, which focuses on using board games to engage the public, using both commercial games and novel games designed by researchers at the University of Oxford.

 

Read more about the awards 

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