Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

Researchers organise 'Science in the Supermarket' events and local visits to showcase MRC-funded research

Visitors to a previous 'Science in the Supermarket' event

The Medical Research Council Festival of Medical Research is an annual event taking place in England, Scotland, Wales, online and in Africa, where a wide range of free public activities showcase MRC-funded research. 

MRC Festival activities include open days, public lectures, debates, activity days, workshops, interactive seminars and quizzes, and this year a number of groups from the Medical Sciences Division will take to the road to give local people a chance to find out how their research is shaping tomorrow's therapies.

Researchers from the CRUK/MRC Oxford Institute for Radiation OncologyMRC Human Immunology Unit , MRC Molecular Haematology Unit, and the MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine will be visiting shopping centres across Oxfordshire, Berkshire, and Buckinghamshire for a series of 'Science in the Supermarket' events, using table top activities to explore the use of genome editing technology in cancer and immunology. These will explain how genome editing works, with two editable DNA molecules challenging visitors to find the sequence to alter without the use of the guide molecule that makes this technique so powerful. Meanwhile a giant bone gives visitors the opportunity to explore how genome editing is being used to cure blood diseases such as anaemia, and researchers will challenge children (and adults!) to search for sick cells that they can turn into healthy cells using the power of genome editing. A final activity explores how genome editing can be use to understand how our cells cope with viruses infections, a smaller version of genetic screens being done in University of Oxford labs (such as demonstrated in this video by the Rehwinkel lab at the MRC WIMM).

In addition, researchers from the MRC Brain Network Dynamics Unit will run activities at a local primary school in Oxford to help pupils understand more about the brain, memory and movement. Activities will include observing nerve cells under a microscope, measuring electrical activity from muscles and discovering different type of memories. Staff and students from the Unit will also host a site visit for lay members of two local groups of charity Parkinson’s UK. Attendees will be people affected by Parkinson’s, including those with the disease, their carers and families, and they will be able to attend talks from scientists, lab tours and Q&A session to learn more about the Unit's research. 

 

You can catch our researchers at the following 'Science in the Supermarket' events: 

Find out more about the Festival

Similar stories

UK and EU regulators conclude benefits of vaccination continue to outweigh the risks

Coronavirus COVID-19 General

Today, the medical regulators in the UK and Europe have announced their conclusions from their reviews of very rare cases of unusual blood clots in people who have received the Oxford-AstraZeneca coronavirus vaccine.

Link between COVID-19 infection and subsequent mental health and neurological conditions found

Coronavirus COVID-19 General Research

One in three COVID-19 survivors received a neurological or psychiatric diagnosis within six months of infection with the SARS-CoV-2 virus, an observational study of more than 230,000 patient health records published in The Lancet Psychiatry journal estimates. The study looked at 14 neurological and mental health disorders.

New national study of long-term impacts of debilitating lung damage from COVID-19

Coronavirus COVID-19 General Research

A new national study will investigate the long-term effects of lung inflammation and scarring from COVID-19. The study, launched with £2 million of funding from UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), aims to develop treatment strategies and prevent disability.

Opportunities for final goodbyes must be prioritised in COVID-19 pandemic

Coronavirus COVID-19 General Research

Bereaved relatives described the ongoing pain of being absent at the end of a loved-one's life. Many had not seen their relative for weeks or months due to the pandemic. Opportunities must be prioritised for essential connections between families at end-of-life care.

New study shows overwhelming public support for donating vaccines to low-income countries

Coronavirus COVID-19 General Research

A survey led by Nuffield Department of Population Health's Health Economics Research Centre has found that most people in high-income countries support donating some of their country’s COVID-19 vaccine supplies to low-income nations who would otherwise struggle to gain access.