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Six departments and two units from the Medical Sciences Division have been awarded Athena SWAN awards, bringing the total number of awards in the Division to 12.

Athena SwanThe National Perinatal Epidemiology Unit (NPEU) received a Silver award, and Bronze awards were awarded to the Departments of Paediatrics, Psychiatry, Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics (DPAG), the Nuffield Departments of Clinical Medicine (NDM), Obstetrics and Gynaecology and Surgical Sciences, and the Department of Cardiovascular Medicine (part of the Radcliffe Department of Medicine).

Athena SWAN awards are given in recognition of a department’s efforts to help promote and advance the careers of women in academia. Medical schools and clinical departments made up 30% of all successful submissions in this latest round of the Athena SWAN Charter awards.

The Head of the Medical Sciences Division, Professor Alastair Buchan, commented: “We are delighted with these results. The eight awards reflect a great deal of effort across the Division to ensure a supportive working environment for all our staff but women especially.”

Professor Jenny Kurinczuk, Director of the National Perinatal Epidemiology Unit, said upon hearing of her department’s Silver award: “We are delighted to hear that we have been awarded a silver level Athena SWAN award. This is testament to the quality of our application led by Maria Quigley, and the contribution of our Athena SWAN working groups, our admin team and the support from Brid Cronin. We have for many years followed the principles recently laid out by Athena SWAN, although we are not complacent and are working to improve the support for female researchers and all our staff following the Athena SWAN plans we developed during the application process."

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