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NDORMS PhD student Akira Wiberg won the main prize of this year's Max Perutz Science Writing Award. The MRC-funded student received the first prize of £1,500 for his article: "Getting on your nerves.", at the awards ceremony on 15 October.

MaxPerutzScienceWritingAward2019.jpgAward-winner Akira Wiberg said: "I'm utterly delighted. It was unexpected so a very pleasant surprise and I'm very pleased that the disease I'm studying - carpal tunnel syndrome - has got a bit of publicity today, because it's very debilitating and important for society. I'm hoping to tread a career as a surgeon scientist. I'm currently a plastic surgery trainee but I want to carry on doing my clinical work alongside research and I think communicating my research with the public is very important. This is my first step in doing that."

Akira's research in the Nuffield Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology & Musculoskeletal Sciences (NDORMS) focusses on understanding the genetic basis of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome, and ultimately shed light on the pathophysiology of nerve injury through compression. The prevalence of the condition in the UK is 7–16%.

The awards were announced by the MRC's Executive Chair Professor Fiona Watt, who chaired the judging panel, and fellow judge Andy Ridgeway, journalist and Senior Lecturer in Science Communication at the University of the West of England in Bristol.

Read more (NDORMS website)

Read the winning article 'Getting on your nerves'

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