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Replacing all regular meals with a low calorie diet of soups, shakes and bars, together with behavioural support, is cost-effective as a routine treatment for obesity, according to researchers from the University of Oxford.

The droplet study infographic

Published today in the journal Obesity, the study is the first to estimate the long term health benefit and builds on the results of the DROPLET trial1, which showed that ‘total diet replacement’ programmes (TDRs) are a safe and effective way to lose weight, with significant weight loss persisting to at least 12 months.

Nearly two thirds of adults in England are overweight or obese, increasing the risk of life-altering illnesses, such as type 2 diabetes, heart disease, stroke, and some cancers.

The NHS recently announced a pilot programme to offer a TDR programme to around 5,000 people with type 2 diabetes and has also committed to offering weight loss support for people with hypertension who are also obese.

Read more (NIHR CLAHRC Oxford website)

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