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Researchers at the University of Oxford have developed a mindfulness training specifically for people with irritable bowel syndrome.

We are interested in finding out if this training is effective at reducing the symptoms of IBS and how the training achieves its effects. Interested? Please keep on reading to find out what is involved for you:

What is involved?

  • A six week mindfulness course
  • Regular study assessments

About the mindfulness course

Mindfulness for IBS is a new mindfulness course specifically for people with irritable bowel syndrome. The course consists of 6 x 2 hour group sessions over 6-7 weeks. During the course you will develop awareness of your mind and body through the cultivation of mindful awareness. The aim of the course is to reduce the symptoms of IBS and help you increase your mental and physical wellbeing.

Study Participation: The course is provided at no cost to you as participant

About the assessments

You will be asked to do 3 assessment visits at the Department of Experimental Psychology and 4-8 online questionnaires before, during and after the course. Each assessment visit takes 1-1.5 hours. Each questionnaire takes 30-45 minutes.

Are you eligible? 

  • Do you have a diagnosis of IBS?
  • Are you interested in trying mindfulness as a treatment for IBS?
  • Are you a woman between 18 and 65 years of age?

Location

Course: Oxford Mindfulness Centre, Oxford University

Assessments: Department of Experimental Psychology, Oxford University

Dates and Registration

To find out more about the study, when the courses take place and to register, please contact Julia Henrich via email Julia.Henrich@psy.ox.ac.uk.

You can also sign up online.

 

NHS REC Reference: REC: South Central – Oxford A, 15/SC/0618

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