Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

Researchers at the University of Oxford have developed a mindfulness training specifically for people with irritable bowel syndrome.

We are interested in finding out if this training is effective at reducing the symptoms of IBS and how the training achieves its effects. Interested? Please keep on reading to find out what is involved for you:

What is involved?

  • A six week mindfulness course
  • Regular study assessments

About the mindfulness course

Mindfulness for IBS is a new mindfulness course specifically for people with irritable bowel syndrome. The course consists of 6 x 2 hour group sessions over 6-7 weeks. During the course you will develop awareness of your mind and body through the cultivation of mindful awareness. The aim of the course is to reduce the symptoms of IBS and help you increase your mental and physical wellbeing.

Study Participation: The course is provided at no cost to you as participant

About the assessments

You will be asked to do 3 assessment visits at the Department of Experimental Psychology and 4-8 online questionnaires before, during and after the course. Each assessment visit takes 1-1.5 hours. Each questionnaire takes 30-45 minutes.

Are you eligible? 

  • Do you have a diagnosis of IBS?
  • Are you interested in trying mindfulness as a treatment for IBS?
  • Are you a woman between 18 and 65 years of age?

Location

Course: Oxford Mindfulness Centre, Oxford University

Assessments: Department of Experimental Psychology, Oxford University

Dates and Registration

To find out more about the study, when the courses take place and to register, please contact Julia Henrich via email Julia.Henrich@psy.ox.ac.uk.

You can also sign up online.

 

NHS REC Reference: REC: South Central – Oxford A, 15/SC/0618

Similar stories

Oxford Researchers elected to Royal Society

Awards and Appointments General

Six scientists from the University of Oxford, including Professor Adrian Hill and Professor Frances Platt from the Medical Sciences Division, have joined the Royal Society as Fellows.

Student Prizes for Biomedical Sciences and Medicine 2020-2021

Awards and Appointments General

Congratulations to all our Biomedical Sciences students and Medicine students who have been awarded prizes during the 2020-2021 academic year.

Multi-partner 'OpenMind' consortium to develop technology for new generation of neurostimulation devices

General Research

Investigators at the University of Oxford, University of California San Francisco (UCSF), Brown University and the Mayo Clinic have joined forces to develop open-source technology platforms for a new generation of neurostimulation devices that not only provide stimulation to the brain but also sense, record, and stream brain activity.

Why we must expand newborn screening

General Research

Professor Laurent Servais of the Department of Paeditrics writes for the Oxford Science Blog on why it is important that we become much more efficient in the diagnosis of treatable conditions and in the treatment of these diseases.

Top place for Oxford Clinical Medical Student in prestigious national Ophthalmology Duke Elder Prize Examination

Awards and Appointments General

Sixth year Clinical Medical student, Ryan Purdy (Worcester College), placed first in the Royal College of Ophthalmology's annual Prize Examination.