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It can’t be easy trying to pick a team for a huge football tournament like the Euros, carrying the hopes of an entire nation.

Football managers may have great skill and intuition, but it is, after all, not an exact science. But what if their talents could be supported by more precise tools informed by the latest research?

It turns out this is becoming a possibility. In a series of scientific studies, we have shown that simple neuropsychological tests of football players' executive functions and working memory can help predict how many goals they will score, how many passes they will make and how successful they will be overall.

Read the full article on The Conversation website, written by Morten L. Kringelbach, Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford, Predrag Petrovic, Karolinska Institute and Torbjörn Vestberg, Karolinska Institute

Oxford is a subscribing member of The Conversation. Find out how you can write for The Conversation.

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