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Stimulating the heart to repair itself is within scientific touching distance, thanks in large part to the work of Professor Paul Riley and his team in the Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics

Image courtesy of Shutterstock

Almost 500 people suffer a heart attack every day in the UK and seven out of ten survive. But the uplifting statistic masks a deeper problem in that most will join the 550,000-strong ranks of people living with debilitating heart failure.

Read more (Department of Anatomy, Physiology and Genetics website)

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