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Researchers from across the Medical Sciences Division are working hard to combat the COVID-19 crises. With particular strengths in infectious diseases and international health, we are well placed to contribute to better understanding and effectively controlling the epidemic. We have a long history of responding to crises, in the UK and around the world and are leaders in emergency vaccine development. During the 2014 Ebola outbreak, our scientists performed the world’s first human Ebola vaccine studies, starting them before any other university or company. Our researchers, in collaboration with partners across the globe, are working to develop an effective vaccine and drugs to target this virus, and have already introduced innovative public health measures and collaborative online tools that are being used in hospitals here and abroad.

Coronavirus-related news from across the Medical Sciences Division

COVID-19 recovery project nominated for HSJ award

The project, involving Oxford University Hospitals, Defence Medical Services (DMS), and the Radcliffe Department of Medicine is in the running for a prestigious honour at the Health Service Journal Awards 2021.

'Finding our Way: An NHS Tribute Garden' at RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2021

‘Finding Our Way – An NHS Tribute Garden’ is a celebration of the incredible efforts of the thousands of people who fought – and are still fighting - the COVID-19 pandemic on our behalf. The garden is designed by Naomi Ferrett-Cohen and presented by Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust and Oxford University.

International study finds insomnia, anxiety and depression very prevalent during first phase of COVID-19 pandemic

An international sleep study has found that insomnia, anxiety, and depression were very prevalent during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. Researchers are recommending public health interventions to reduce the long-term adverse outcomes associated with chronic insomnia and mental health problems.

Vaccine for treating cancer made possible using Oxford COVID vaccine technology

Research from the University of Oxford and the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research has shown that the technology behind the Oxford-AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine has potential in treating cancer

Coronavirus Epidemics first hit more than 21,000 years ago

Sarbecoviruses have crossed into humans twice in the last decade, leading to the deadly SARS-CoV-1 outbreak in 2002-04 and the current COVID-19 pandemic, caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus. A new Oxford University Study, published today, shows that the most recent common ancestor of these viruses existed more than 21,000 years ago, nearly 30 times older than previous estimates.

AI test screens for COVID-19 26% faster than lateral flow tests

An Artificial Intelligence (AI) test performed by the bedside in 10 minutes quickly and safely triages patients coming to hospital for COVID-19, a University of Oxford-led study has shown.

Covid-19, not vaccination, presents biggest blood clot risks

Researchers from the University of Oxford have today announced the results of a study into thrombocytopenia (a condition with low platelet counts) and thromboembolic events (blood clots) following vaccination for Covid-19, some of the same events which have led to restricted use of the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine in a number of countries.

Study reveals COVID-19 vaccine response in patients with impaired immune systems

A national study has found that a significant proportion of clinically at-risk patients with certain immunocompromised or immunosuppressed conditions, mount a low, or undetectable, immune response after two doses of the same COVID-19 vaccine.

Vaccines still effective against Delta variant of concern, says Oxford-led study of the COVID-19 Infections Survey

Obtaining two vaccine doses remains the most effective way to ensure protection against the COVID-19 Delta variant of concern dominant in the UK today, according to a study from the University of Oxford.