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People who monitor their own blood pressure at home are most likely to see a benefit if they combine it with individually tailored intensive support, according to a new systematic literature review and meta-analysis published this week in PLOS Medicine by an international group led by researchers in Oxford University's Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences

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Home blood pressure monitoring is currently recommended for people with high blood pressure so health professionals can see if their prescribed treatment is working and make necessary adjustments. While previous research has shown that self-monitoring reduces clinic blood pressure by a small but significant amount, it has remained unclear how best to implement it and for which patients it might be most useful.

Read more (Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences website)