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Researchers are hopeful of a cure for HIV after treating the first patient with a promising new treatment that could kill all traces of the virus.

© Liya Graphics - Shutterstock

The study involves activating 'sleeping' HIV-infected cells in the body – but researchers say it will take until the conclusion of the study in 2018 to know if there has been an effect on curing HIV.

A partnership sparked by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) is behind this collaborative UK effort for the new treatment, which is a first-of-its-kind.

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