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The conversation 5

Smoking kills one in two regular smokers, but quitting at any point in life leads to big improvements in health, increased life expectancy and savings in healthcare costs. That’s why we need a range of ways to help people quit – and new evidence shows that paying people to quit is one way to boost quit rates.

Our recently updated Cochrane review looked at the evidence from 33 trials and found strong evidence that incentive programmes help people to quit smoking, increasing quit rates at six months or longer by about 50%. In these programmes, smokers who could prove they’d quit smoking were rewarded financially. Some have expressed concern that smokers would return to smoking once the financial rewards ended, but the studies showed that people stayed smoke free, even after the rewards finished.

Read the full article on The Conversation website, written by Jamie Hartmann-Boyce (Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences) and Caitlin Notley (University of East Anglia)

Oxford is a subscribing member of The ConversationFind out how you can write for The Conversation.