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Blood disorders cost the European economy a total of €23 billion in 2012, while healthcare costs per patient with blood cancers are two times higher than average cancer costs, due to long hospital stays and complex treatment and diagnosis. Those are results from two studies published in The Lancet Haematology.

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Blood cancers are also associated with considerable healthcare costs with the cost of treating one patient approximately two times higher than the average cost per patient across all cancers.  

Blood disorders include a range of disorders such as anaemia, blood cancers, haemorrhagic disorders, blood cell disorders and disorders of the spleen of immune mechanism. The most common blood disorder is anaemia which reduces the number of red blood cells, hampering the ability of blood to carry oxygen. Blood cancers (e.g. Hodgkin's lymphoma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, multiple myeloma, and leukaemia) are one of the 10 most common forms of cancer and are responsible for approximately 100,000 deaths in Europe every year.

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Image: Euro Scheine 1 via photopin (license)

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