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A report, recently published by the General Medical Council (GMC), on the progression of doctors in postgraduate training, provides clear evidence of the outstanding achievement of Oxford Medical School graduates.

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The GMC report includes data on postgraduate examinations taken by graduates from all UK medical schools, and shows that Oxford Medical School graduates have outstanding results in their postgraduate exams. The Oxford pass rate of 88.5% is significantly above the average for all UK medical schools of 72% (range 50%-88.5%).

Dr Tim Lancaster, Director of Clinical Studies at the Oxford Medical School, commented: ‘We have had previous evidence of outstanding achievement by Oxford graduates in postgraduate examinations in medicine, general practice, anaesthetics and obstetrics and gynaecology. This new evidence not only confirms those results but extends them to all the other specialties. It is very pleasing to see Oxford graduates performing to the same high level in other popular specialties, including psychiatry, surgery and paediatrics. The results are remarkably consistent across the board.’

The GMC also reports on in-service performance of postgraduate trainees. In an analysis of Annual Review of Competence Progression (ARCP) assessments between 2009 and 2013, Oxford graduates demonstrated the highest proportions of satisfactory outcomes in the country. Their results were superior to the national mean in every training specialty.

Dr Lancaster added: ‘There is a long standing debate in medical education about the extent to which examination performance does or does not predict real life clinical ability. The ARCP data provide significant evidence that there is indeed a strong link between examination results and on the job performance. We would like to congratulate our graduates on their achievements, and we are delighted to have this evidence that Oxford is delivering on its mission to provide the NHS with high quality medical staff.’

A further analysis of recruitment data shows that Oxford graduates are highly successful in obtaining training posts in their first choice specialty. 84.5% of foundation year 2 trainees received first round offers in the 2014 recruitment to specialty training, the second highest proportion in the country.

Read the full results from the GMC Report

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