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• £110m Precision Cancer Medicine Institute to be established, with £35m Hefce grant • New institute will include research on the use of proton beam therapy • £22m Centre for Molecular Medicine to focus on cancer genomics and molecular diagnostics, through a partnership with the Chan Soon-Shiong Institute

Two large new research partnerships will see Oxford University take the very latest cancer research forward.

It will see major new research programmes in understanding the genetic and molecular changes underlying a patient's tumour, as well as trials of novel cancer drugs and the latest in surgery and proton beam therapy.

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