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FOXFIRE Combined Analysis indicates no benefit in overall survival from adding selective internal radiotherapy [SIRT] to first-line oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy for metastatic colorectal cancer.

The FOXFIRE Combined Analysis was a study of 1,103 patients randomised to receive either standard first-line chemotherapy for colorectal cancer that has spread to the liver, or the same chemotherapy plus a treatment procedure called selective internal radiotherapy using radioactive yttrium-90 resin microspheres.  The primary analysis of this study, which combines data from the SIRFLOX study first presented in 2015 with data from two new studies – FOXFIRE and FOXFIRE-Global – was published today as an abstract by the American Society of Clinical Oncology; it demonstrates no difference in overall survival between patients treated with microspheres plus chemotherapy compared to patients treated with chemotherapy alone.

Read more (Department of Oncology website)  

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