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The following Medical Sciences Division’s professors were elected as Fellows of the Academy of Medical Sciences today:

  • Professor Matthew Freeman FRS, Professor of Pathology and Head of Dunn School of Pathology
  • Professor Simon Hay, Professor of Epidemiology, Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine
  • Professor Ian Pavord, Professor of Respiratory Medicine, Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine
  • Professor Irene Tracey, Nuffield Professor Anasthetic Science and Head Nuffield Division of Anaesthetics, Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences

They join over a 1000 distinguished scientists, recognised by the Academy for their outstanding contributions and continued excellence in medical sciences.

Professor Alastair Buchan, Dean of Medicine and Head of Division commented: “I should like to take this opportunity to congratulate Matthew, Simon, Ian and Irene. They are truly worthy of this prestigious honour, working tirelessly as they do, in their respective areas to further our collective knowledge. We have such a dedicated and exceptional group of staff in the Medical Sciences Division, and the achievement of these four only further highlights our strengths across the medical sciences.”

Links:

Read more (Academy of Medical Sciences website) 

Related news (Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine website)

Related news (Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences website)

 

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