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Five Oxford Clinical Medical Students place in top 10% in prestigious national Ophthalmology Duke Elder Prize Examination

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Fifth year Clinical Medical student, Mr John Logan (St Edmund Hall), gained an impressive 14th place in the Royal College of Ophthalmology's annual Prize Examination. Mr Logan was one of 370 medical students from 38 medical schools across the UK and Ireland who took the exam this year. In addition, Mr Benjamin Ng (5th Year/Christ Church College) and Mr Alexander Noar (6th Year/St John’s College), were both ranked 17th and Miss Anni Ding (6th Year/St John’s College) and Mr Dun Jack Fu (Graduate Entry 4th Year/St Hugh’s College) were placed in the top 10%.

The Royal College of Ophthalmology advise that the standard of the exam is deliberately high and those students taking the top places are to be congratulated. The names of students gaining a top 20 place are published and the candidate gaining the highest mark is offered the chance to visit St John’s Eye Hospital in Jerusalem or a monetary prize of £400. 

Questions are mostly based on clinical ophthalmology but other areas covered include ocular physiology, anatomy and pathology as well as genetics of eye conditions and socio-economic medicine relevant to ophthalmology  (for example, blind registration or world blindness).  In the clinical questions all the sub-speciality areas within ophthalmology are covered.

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