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The study led by MRC WIMM researchers as part of an international team aims to understand what happens when patients stop responding to treatment.

3D image of red blood cells

Acute Myeloid Leukaemia (AML) is the most common and aggressive blood cancer in adults and is incurable in most patients. About 12-15% of AML patients have a mutation in the IDH2 gene that stops bone marrow cells from differentiating, or maturing, into blood cells that are required for life. Instead, these immature cells accumulate in the bone marrow and blood, which is a hallmark of AML. 

Find out more (MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine website)

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New heart disease calculator could save lives by identifying high-risk patients missed by current tools

Collaborative research, led by the Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences (NDPCHS) and published today in Nature Medicine, has developed a new tool called QR4 that more accurately predicts an individual's 10-year risk of cardiovascular diseases, like heart disease and stroke, particularly identifying high-risk patients that current prediction tools miss.