Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

Increased funding is needed to eliminate malaria across 22 Asia-Pacific countries and save an estimated 400,000 lives, according to research published in a new collection of studies on Wellcome Open Research.

Child writing on a blackboard © MORU 2019. Photographer: Nicky Almasy
A Cambodian child teaches his classmates what he's learned about malaria control, part of MORU's activities to raise community awareness in malaria-endemic areas of the importance of malaria prevention and the importance of early treatment. (c) MORU 2019. Photographer: Nicky Almasy.

Although Asia-Pacific countries have made significant progress towards their goal of eliminating malaria by 2030, collection researchers warn that stagnating donor funding puts at risk national malaria control efforts and access to lifesaving drugs and other tools, and could, under one potential scenario, result in as many as 845 million more malaria cases and 3.5 million deaths.

“This evidence-based investment case for the region comes from preliminary estimates to quantify the economic benefits of eliminating malaria, which could save hundreds of thousands of lives, avoid millions of malaria cases, and generate billions in healthcare savings, as well as savings from lost wages and productivity due to illness.” said collection advisor and study author Prof Richard Maude from the Mahidol Oxford Tropical Medicine Research Unit (MORU) in Bangkok.

“While the cost of eliminating malaria in the Asia Pacific is not insignificant, it will result in a large return on investment. For every additional dollar spent, there was predicted to be an overall economic benefit of USD $6 for the affected countries,” said lead study author Rima Shretta.

Read more (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Centre for Tropical Medicine & Global Health website)

Similar stories

First trimester placental scan - Artificial Intelligence in Health and Care Award

A first trimester 3D placental ultrasound scan which can predict fetal growth restriction and pre-eclampsia, could become part of a woman's routine care thanks to a new Artificial Intelligence in Health and Care Award.

Impaired antibody response to COVID-19 vaccination in patients with myeloid blood cancers

Oxford researchers have found that antibody responses to the first doses of COVID-19 vaccine in people with chronic myeloid blood cancers are not as strong as those among the general population.

Treating Needle Fears May Reduce COVID-19 Vaccine Hesitancy Rates by 10%

A new large-scale study shows that a quarter of the UK adult population screens positive for a potential injection phobia.

RECOVERY trial Regeneron’s monoclonal antibody combination reduces deaths for hospitalised COVID-19 patients

The Randomised Evaluation of COVID-19 Therapy (RECOVERY) trial has demonstrated that the investigational antibody combination developed by Regeneron reduces the risk of death when given to patients hospitalised with severe COVID-19 who have not mounted a natural antibody response of their own.

Major new study could help protect millions of people with type 2 diabetes from cardiovascular disease

A new study led by the Nuffield Department of Population Health at the University of Oxford will research whether a daily tablet could help protect the millions of people worldwide with type 2 diabetes from developing cardiovascular disease.

Professor Susan Jebb appointed as Chair of the Food Standards Agency

Susan Jebb, Professor of Diet and Population Health in Oxford University’s Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, has been appointed as the new Chair of the Food Standards Agency.