Cookies on this website

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Accept all cookies' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. If you click 'Reject all non-essential cookies' only necessary cookies providing core functionality such as security, network management, and accessibility will be enabled. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

The Conversation logo

Lots of people are greeting the new year with plans to quit smoking. The good news is, there is more evidence than ever on the best ways to boost your chances of success. In this article, we cover the different methods that science suggests are worth a shot.

Read the full article on The Conversation website, written by Dr Jamie Hartmann-Boyce and Dr Nicola Lindson (Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences)

Oxford is a subscribing member of The ConversationFind out how you can write for The Conversation.

Similar stories

Sensory Supermarket event helps businesses make public-facing spaces more inclusive for autistic people

Researchers from the Universities of Oxford and Reading – in collaboration with awareness-raising organisation Sensory Spectacle – are hosting an innovative event called Sensory Supermarket as part of the Sensory Street research project.

Tackling suicide risk in people with mental disorders

Clinical researchers from Oxford University’s Department of Psychiatry and Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust, together with colleagues from elsewhere, have developed guidance to help clinicians identify and treat patients at risk of suicide.

Environmental impact of 57,000 multi-ingredient processed foods revealed

A study estimating the environmental impact of 57,000 food products in the UK and Ireland has been published by an Oxford-led research team in the journal PNAS.

Oxford spinout MiroBio acquired by Gilead Sciences for $405m

The inflammatory diseases company’s rapid ascent and exit underscores the importance of friendships, partnerships and networks in innovation.

DPAG hosts successful first Science in the Park event

More than 100 children, along with around 50 parents, grandparents and caregivers enjoyed an exciting variety of activities on the theme of ‘How the Body Works’ in University Parks on Tuesday 26 July. This ‘Science in the Park’ event was run by the Department of Physiology, Anatomy & Genetics (DPAG) Outreach and Public Engagement Working Group (OPEWG) and volunteers comprising research scientists, clinical anatomy teaching staff, and graduate and undergraduate students.