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The conversation 5

Meal-replacement diets, where some meals are replaced with soups, shakes or bars, have been making a comeback. They first took off during the early days of space travel when the public became obsessed with the idea of a nutritionally complete meal in a single drink or bar. These products remained popular for most of the 70s and 80s, but gradually fell from favour as people began to question the health benefits of these diets.

There are many myths surrounding meal-replacement diets, so we set out to scrutinise the evidence. Drawing on our own research and that of others, we can now debunk some of these myths.

Read the full article on The Conversation website, written by Nerys Astbury, Senior Researcher, Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences. 

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