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Using a paper crane as a prop, Fodor lab DPhil student Bernadeta Dadonaite explained the potential of DNA origami technology to a capacity audience at the FameLab 2017 regional final at the Bullingdon bar and club in Oxford on 8 March.

FameLab helps communicate science to the general public in digestible three-minute competitive performances by students and researchers across the fields of science and engineering.  Running in over 25 countries worldwide the competition started at Cheltenham Science Festival in 20015.  Science Oxford runs the Oxford heats. 

Bernadeta was one of eight regional finalists grilled by a judging panel of experts from across Oxford: John Runions,  Reader in Cell and Molecular Biology at Oxford Brookes University; Jennifer Rogers, Vice President for External Affairs at the Royal Statistical Society and Director of Statistical Consultancy Services at Oxford University; and Alison Woollard, Oxford University Academic Champion for Public Engagement with Research. YouTube science vlogger Sally le Page hosted the event.

Read more (Sir William Dunn School of Pathology website)

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