Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

Wellcome Centre for Human Genetics researcher Dr Ross Chapman has been selected as one of the European Molecular Biology Organisation's Young Investigators for 2018.

Dr Ross Chapman.jpg

The EMBO Young Investigator Programme identifies recent group leaders with a proven record of scientific excellence and offers them access to a range of benefits during their four-year tenure. These include an award of 15,000 euros, with the potential for additional funding, mentorship by a senior scientist from the community of EMBO Members, access to training in leadership skills and responsible research practices, as well as networking opportunities.

Additional benefits provided by the Programme include the use of core facilities at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory in Heidelberg, Germany, and travel grants for the Young Investigators and their research groups to attend conferences.

“The accepted candidates have all shown outstanding promise in their early careers and impressed our selection committee with both the quality of their current work and their proposals for future research:” said EMBO Director, Maria Leptin. “We look forward to supporting them in establishing their own research groups.”

Dr Ross Chapman commented: “I’m thrilled for having been selected as an EMBO Young Investigator. It’s going to be great to interact with a community of young scientists involved in exciting and cutting-edge research. I’m also very grateful for the benefits its going to bring to my group. The EMBO young investigator programme comes with lots of opportunities for my team members to interact with scientists across Europe, and also allows them to apply for travel grants and receive training. Most importantly, this support from EMBO is aimed towards increasing the visibility of my group's research, and this is also going to profit the whole team.”

The 2018 group of Young Investigators comprises scientists based in 11 countries, including two European Molecular Biology Conference (EMBC) Associate Member States: India and Singapore.

The next application deadline is 1 April 2019. More information is available at http://www.embo.org/funding-awards/young-investigators

Similar stories

PhD Student of the Year 2022 Winner!

Congratulations to Nuffield Department of Women's & Reproductive Health DPhil student Josephine Agyeman-Duah on being named winner of PhD Student of the Year at the Postgrad Awards 2022.

Student Prizes for Biomedical Sciences and Medicine 2021-2022

Congratulations to all our Biomedical Sciences students and Medicine students who have been awarded prizes during the 2021-2022 academic year.

New study finds that politicians typically enjoy longer lives than general populations

New data show politicians have a considerable survival advantage over general populations, based on information from 11 countries and over 57,500 politicians. In some countries this survival advantage is at the highest level for 150 years, and life expectancy at age 45 was found to be around seven years higher for politicians compared to general populations in certain countries.

Five ways the pandemic has affected routine medical care

Since the beginning of the pandemic, COVID has infected at least a third of the UK population and is estimated to have factored in the deaths of almost 200,000 people in the UK. But critically, COVID has also had a devastating impact on our healthcare systems. While this was expected, new evidence is beginning to reveal the scope of the issue – in particular the effects for people living with long-term health conditions.

Clinical trials for a malaria vaccine start in Mali and Indonesia

Sanaria Inc. announced that two new Phase 2 trials of its pioneering malaria vaccines have started. The first is in 6- to 10-year-old children living in Bancoumana, Mali, a malarious region of West Africa. The second is in Indonesian soldiers based in Sumatra, Indonesia. The soldiers will be deploying for six to nine months this coming August to an intensely malarious district in eastern Indonesia.