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Congratulations to Dr Beth Psaila, who has won a prestigious Fellowship at the L’Oréal-UNESCO UK and Ireland For Women In Science awards. She was one of five scientists to receive the highly competitive award.

Beth (second from right) with other winners and Prof Dame Carol Robinson

The annual Fellowships programme provides £15,000 of flexible financial support for outstanding female postdoctoral researchers to continue research in their fields, as part of a wider L’Oréal-UNESCO programme aimed at supporting and increasing the number of women working in STEM professions in the UK, where 85% of jobs are held by men.

Dr Beth Psaila (WIMM-NDCLS) is a haematologist examining the role of blood cells in the bone marrow, known as megakaryocytes, in a rare but fatal disease called Myelofibrosis which destroys the bone marrow. Most patients live for fewer than five years after diagnosis, and 20% develop blood cancer. Current treatments help symptoms but do not cure the condition or improve survival. The condition is triggered by a mutation in a key gene called JAK2, and better understanding how the disease develops at a genetic level could help in the design of new treatments.

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