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Bernard Naughton and Dr David Brindley from Oxford University’s Saïd Business School and Medical Sciences Division discuss the problems of identifying fake, substandard and expired medicines.

Packets of medicine © EM Karuna - Shutterstock

Pharmaceuticals are critical to our society, supporting patient health and an innovative industrial sector. Research and development (R&D) by leading pharmaceutical companies totals hundreds of billions of pounds globally each year. These extraordinarily high development risks contribute to the sometimes high reimbursement costs of medicines. Therefore, it comes as no surprise, that as with most large and lucrative industries it attracts its share of bootleggers.

Read more (Oxford Science blog)

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