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On 12th July 2013, Sir Michael and Lady Betty Kadoorie officially opened the new extension of the Kadoorie Centre for critical care, research and education. The Kadoorie Centre, located at Oxford’s John Radcliffe Hospital, is a place for collaborative research and development in critical care, traumatic injury and rehabilitation. Oxford University and NHS staff work with patients and clinical colleagues to ensure good quality research is developed that will improve patient care.

2013-07-22 Collaborative Research CentreCurrent activities include the clinical effectiveness of: different forms of monitoring acutely ill patients, limb supports following injury, wound dressings, exercise regimens, different forms of ventilation (support for breathing), drugs that promote fracture healing; and studies that assess recovery from major injuries/illness over time.

Sir Michael has personal experience of trauma after having a car crash in 1998. Professor Keith Willett and the trauma team at the John Radcliffe Hospital cared for him. During the opening ceremony, Sir Michael Kadoorie spoke warmly of the care he received as a patient at the JR and his on-going support for the Kadoorie Centre reflects his desire to help improve the care for others who experience serious injury. Professor Keith Willett provided a short history of the Kadoorie Centre and formally thanked Sir Michael and Lady Betty Kadoorie for their continued generous support.

Dame Fiona Caldicott, Chair of the Oxford University NHS Hospitals Trust, and Professor Nick Rawlins, Pro Vice Chancellor of Oxford University, also expressed their thanks to Sir Michael and Lady Betty Kadoorie and their support for the Kadoorie Centre. Staff provided a brief overview of current research activities and Sir Michael Kadoorie expressed a great deal of interest in the research areas. 

Sir Michael and Lady Betty Kadoorie very kindly supported phase one of the Kadoorie centre, opened in July 2003. Professor Keith Willett, Dr Duncan Young, Dr Peter Watkinson and Professor Sallie Lamb have since been so successful that that a further major donation from Sir Michael has supported the development of phase two. The expansion has created office space for a further 21 staff, a meeting room and staff room and remodelled the reception area.  Craig Merrifield, Senior Project Manager for the Oxford University NHS Hospitals Trust, has overseen the project and the many challenges of building onto a busy working hospital, all during the appalling weather over the winter. Ian Williamson, Willmott Dixon construction, has shown grit and determination despite the challenges and has supported the project throughout keeping the building programme moving forward. The building has many eco-friendly features which includes solar panels that create electricity for the hospital.

For further details of on-going research, go to the Kadoorie website at www.ouh.nhs.uk/Kadoorie.

Image (left to right): Professor Keith Willett, Sir Michael and Lady Betty Kadoorie at opening ceremony

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