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The annual National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Oxford cognitive health Clinical Research Facility (CRF) Open Day, held Tuesday 19 May, was a great success, with patients, public, carers and various teams from across the Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust and Oxford universities in attendance.

The CRF, which provides a wide range of clinical and scientific resources and patient facilities to enable high quality translational neuroscience studies, invited participants to a variety of talks, interactive sessions and poster presentations.

Mary-Jane Attenburrow, Senior Clinical Research Fellow and Clinical Lead CRF commented: “We were delighted to see so many people visit the CRF for International Clinical Trials Day. One of the presentations was given by a patient who gave a  very powerful, moving  and informative account of the experience of living with bipolar disorder, she has also been actively involved in many research studies.”

In addition, Professor John Geddes, Head of Department of Psychiatry (University of Oxford), Director of Research & Development (Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust) said of the day:  “The success of the open day – and the increase in scale and attendance since last year - clearly demonstrates that Oxford Health NHS FT is now engaging with research very seriously and with a clear sense of purpose. Working with colleagues across the Academic Health Sciences Centre, NIHR nationally and internationally, I expect a further exponential growth over the forthcoming year – with delivery of real benefits for our patients.”

Links:

Clinical Research Facility (CRF)

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