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A review by the respected Cochrane organisation, and led by Oxford University Professor of Psychiatry Keith Hawton, has found that psychological therapies, more commonly known as 'talking treatments', may help people who self-harm.

Self-harm is intentional self-poisoning or self-injury. Many people who are admitted to hospital because of this are at an increased risk of self-harming again and of suicide.  It is a major problem in many countries, leads to high levels of distress for patients and their families and friends, and places significant demands on health services.

Psychosocial interventions could involve specific psychological therapies as well as maintaining support and contact with patients.  Psychological therapies are usually a type of 'talking treatment'. Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT), a specific type of psychological therapy, focuses on how a patient's beliefs and attitudes affect their feelings and behaviour, and aims to help them respond to and deal with their problems.

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