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Prof Angela Russell has been named as a ‘Rising Star’ in the BioBeat 50 Movers and Shakers in BioBusiness 2016 report.

Released annually, the report celebrates 50 outstanding women entrepreneurs and business leaders who are recognised for their contributions to global health innovation.  BioBeat’s founder Miranda Weston-Smith said that the report highlights those women who are “transforming today’s challenges into tomorrow’s opportunities” and are inspirational “pioneers who are setting the pace in laboratories, healthcare, entrepreneurial companies …“ among others. 

Angela Russell, Associate Professor of Medicinal Chemistry at the Departments of Chemistry and Pharmacology at the University of Oxford and co-founder of OxStem Ltd said “I am delighted to have been recognised in this report standing alongside some exceptional bioscience business leaders in the field.  Our research at OxStem has the potential to impact on the healthcare of millions worldwide with the approach of developing small molecule drugs in a wide range of therapeutic areas including cancer, neurodegenerative diseases and heart failure.  I hope that my nomination, together with the women featured in this report, helps to inspire the next generation of bioscience entrepreneurs”.

BioBeat 50 Movers and Shakers in BioBusiness 2016 report

Angela Russell, Associate Professor of Medicinal Chemistry, University of Oxford and Co-founder OxStem. Launched in May 2016, Angela co-founded OxStem, a revolutionary University of Oxford spin-out company focussed on regenerative medicine. OxStem aims to identify new classes of drugs that can reprogram or stimulate existing resident cells to repair tissues in age-related conditions including cancer, neurodegenerative diseases and heart failure. The company has raised £16.9 million this year, a record for a UK spin-out, to fund the development of a series of daughter companies.

In her academic career, with over 15 years medicinal chemistry experience, Angela has published over 80 original articles, book chapters and patent applications and co-founded the Oxford spin-out MuOx Ltd, acquired by Summit Therapeutics plc in 2013.

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