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One of the most intriguing physics discoveries of the last century was the existence of antimatter, material that exists as the “mirror image” of subatomic particles of matter, such as electrons, protons and quarks, but with the opposite charge. Antimatter deepened our understanding of our universe and the laws of physics, and now the same idea is being proposed to explain something equally mysterious: memory.

Read the full article on The Conversation website, written by Harriet Dempsey-Jones, Nuffield Department of Clinical Neuroscienves.

Oxford is a subscribing member of The Conversation. Find out how you can write for The Conversation.

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