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Medical Sciences Business Development & Partnering Team are delighted to announce that the AIMday in Advanced Therapies & Regenerative Medicine is now open for registration by academics.

Are you an academic interested in finding out how your knowledge can be used to solve industry challenges? Would you like to widen your network? Meet potential collaborators / future employees? Gain insights into relevant funding schemes? 

If you answer YES to any of the above, now is the time to register for the AIMday in Advanced Therapies & Regenerative Medicine, taking place on Wednesday 3 April at the Blavatnik School of Government. A range of companies including LIft Biosciences, Alcyomics, Oxford MEStar, Novo Nordisk, DJS Antibodies, The Electrospinning Company and Bio-Techne are registered to attend, and it will be a fantastic opportunity for researchers looking to network with industry and discuss relevant questions. To see the questions posed by these companies, please visit aimday.se/atrm-2019/questions-listing.

This years AIMday follows on from previous successful AIMdays in Ageing (2016), Microscopy (2017) and Biomedical Imaging (2018).

FREE registration for academics is now open and closes on 15 March. 

Please note, advance registration is essential

To register and find out more, please visit aimday.se/ATRM-2019

What are AIMdays?

  • AIMdays provide a platform for companies to host roundtable discussions with a group of self-selecting academics
  • Industry sets the agenda and topics for discussion
  • Academics from across multiple disciplines sign up to participate in the discussions

How does it work?

Step 1: Companies submit a question/s around the theme of the day

Step 2: Oxford’s researchers sign up to answer one or more of the questions

Step 3: One question, one hour for discussion, one group of experts

 

For additional information please contact amira.burshan@medsci.ox.ac.uk

Find out more about the work of the Business Development & Partnering Team

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