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Could oxygen sensing revolutionise human medical treatment? How does light affect our behaviour? And how do bacteria sense their micro worlds? These are some of the questions addressed by Biosense, a new exhibition opening this week at the Oxford University Museum of Natural History.

Biosense logoBiosense celebrates the University’s leading science research by combining scientific stories with incredible images and previously unseen museum specimens. The exhibition is designed to appeal to the Museum’s adult audience and is the first in a new series of contemporary science ‘mash-ups’ which brings public interest research into the historic Museum.

Professor Paul Smith, director of the Museum of Natural History, said:
‘This is the first exhibition in the Museum’s ambitious new Contemporary Science & Society series that will look at current multi-disciplinary research into organisms and the natural environment, all within the splendour of the Museum’s Victorian building.’

Accompanying the exhibition will be a Biosense trail to encourage visitors to discover other specimens in the displays that are relevant to the show. On selected Saturday afternoons there will also be a programme of interactive sessions where visitors can meet the scientists behind the research and hear more about their work.

Biosense runs 8 May to 24 August 2015. Full Museum programme available on the website.

Links:

Museum of Natural History

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